Is the guide for me?

This guide is for you if:

  • you are an employer and produce your employees’ ROEs;
  • your employees; you work for a small, medium or large business and produce ROEs for it;
  • you are a professional (for example, an accountant, an accounting clerk or a payroll manager) and file ROEs on behalf of your clients.

Notes This guide contains general information on how to complete the ROE. If you are filing ROEs on the web and need technical information, see the ROE help instructions, or call the Employer Service Center at 1-800-367-5693 (TTY: 1-855 -881 to 9874).

If you are producing on the Web and need technical information, see the Web help instructions, or call the Employer Service Center at (: 1-855-881-9874). For the most recent ROE information, see our ROE pages.

What is the Record of Employment?

The ROE is the paper or electronic form that every employer must fill out for each employee who receives insurable earnings, stops working and has an interruption of earnings. The ROE is the most important document in the employment insurance program. Each year, more than one million Canadian employers produce more than nine million ROEs for their employees.

You must complete the ROE even if the employee does not intend to claim Employment Insurance benefits. You indicate the employee’s work history within your organization, including his insurable earnings and his insurable hours.

There are two ways to file ROEs: electronically and on paper.

Chapter 1: Record of Employment Information the end of the

What is the electronic record of employment?

The electronic ROE is sent to Service Canada electronically.

You can send the electronic ROE in three ways:

via ROE Web, using compatible payroll software to send ROEs from a payroll management system;

, using compatible payroll software to send them from a payroll management system; by RE Web, by entering data manually on the Service Canada website; and

, by entering data manually on the Service Canada website; and protected automated transfer (APR), a batch transfer method used by payroll service providers.

There are two types of electronic ROE, Web RO or TAP ROE. Depending on the type, the serial number begins with one of the following letters:

W – RE Web

Web S – RE TAP

ROE Web is an efficient, reliable, secure and easy-to-use tool that allows you to create, send, modify ROEs on the Web and print them. It also allows you to harmonize the production of ROEs with your pay cycle.

For more information on ROE Web, visit the Service Canada website, or call the Employer Service Center at 1-800-367-5693 (TTY: 1-855-881-9874).

What is a paper employment record?

The paper ROE is a one page form in three copies; the first constitutes the original, while the second and third are certified copies.

When you have completed the paper ROE, you must distribute the three copies as follows:

give copy 1 to the employee who will use it to apply for EI benefits (this is the copy the employee will use to apply for EI benefits);

send copy 2 (blue) to Service Canada (see Where should I send copy 2 of the paper ROE?);

keep copy 3 for your records.

There are different types of paper ROEs. Depending on the type, the serial number begins with one of the following letters:

A – RE in English or French (this series is sold out; these REs can therefore no longer be ordered, but they are still valid)

in English or French (this series is sold out; these can no longer be ordered, but they are still valid) E – RE in English

in English K – RE in French

in French L – RE laser (this production mode is no longer used; it has been replaced by RE Web)

laser (this production method is no longer used; it has been replaced by Web) Z – Fishermen’s REs (the procedure for filling out this type of REs is not the same as for other REs; to find out more, see Procedure to complete the record of employment for self-employed fishermen)

What does Service Canada do with the ROE information?

We use the information in the ROE to determine whether a person who is experiencing a loss of earnings is eligible for EI benefits, as well as to determine the amount and duration of EI benefits. We also use the ROE to ensure that no one misuses or receives Employment Insurance benefits in error.

For residents of Quebec, we share the information on the ROE with the government of that province, which administers the maternity, paternity, parental and adoption benefits paid to residents of Quebec under the Quebec Plan parental insurance.

This is why it is very important to ensure that the information you provide on the ROE is accurate.

What is meant by “insurable earnings” and “insurable hours”?

By insurable earnings, we mean most of the types of earnings you pay to your employees from which EI premiums are deducted. Insurable hours are the hours for which employees have received insurable earnings. Service Canada determines what pay period insurable earnings are to be allocated to the ROE, but the Canada Revenue Agency determines what types of earnings and hours are insurable. For more information, see Appendix 1 on Types of insurable earnings and hours, or the Canada Revenue Agency.

What happens when earnings and hours are not insurable?

In some cases, compensation and hours are not insurable. Employment is not insurable, for example, when the employee does not deal at arm’s length with the employer or when the employee holds more than 40% of the voting shares of the company which employs him.

You should only produce a record of employment for employees whose wages and hours are insurable. If you have any doubts about the insurability of an employee’s compensation and hours, contact the Canada Revenue Agency for a decision on insurability. See the section called “Do you want information on insurability?” To find out how to contact the Canada Revenue Agency.

What is an interruption of earnings?

There is an interruption of earnings in the following situations:

when the employee has been or plans to be without work and has not received or does not expect to receive any insurable earnings from his employer for seven consecutive calendar days, there is an interruption of earnings. This situation is known as the seven-day rule. This applies, for example, when employees leave their jobs, are laid off or are laid off (see exceptions in the table below). When the seven-day rule applies, the first day of interruption of earnings is considered to be the last paid day (for more information, see box 11 – Last paid day).

, there is interruption of earnings. This situation is designated by the name of. This applies, for example, when employees leave their jobs, are laid off or are laid off (see exceptions in the table below). When the seven-day rule applies, the first day of interruption of earnings is considered to be the last paid day (for more information, see box 11 – Last paid day). when the employee earns less than 60% of their normal weekly earnings because they are sick, injured or quarantined, caring for or supporting their seriously ill child or family member or because that he is caring for a newborn baby, that he has adopted a child or, if it is an employee, because she is pregnant or because she has given birth to a child, there is an interruption of earnings. In such a case, the first day of interruption of earnings is the Sunday of the week in which he earns less than 60% of his normal weekly earnings.

Example Julio usually works 40 hours a week and earns an insurable gross salary of $ 1,000. Because he is sick, he can only work 16 hours a week and now earns $ 400 a week, which is 40% of his normal weekly earnings. In this case, the first week he earns $ 400 is when there is a break in earnings, and Sunday of that week is the first day of Julio’s stop pay.

When the employee begins to receive payments from a disability insurance plan, there is an interruption of earnings. For more information, see the table on how to complete box 19.

Exceptions to the seven-day rule

The seven-day rule does not apply in the following cases:

Real estate agents: There is an interruption of earnings only when a real estate agent renounces his license or when it is suspended or revoked, unless the agent stops working because he is sick, injured, quarantined, provides care or support to a seriously ill child or family member, cares for a newborn, adopted a child or, if it is an agent, because she is pregnant or has given birth to a child. In other words, if the agent stops working for any other reason, for example because he is on authorized leave or on vacation, there is no interruption of earnings as long as the contract is valid. For more information on how to complete the RE for real estate agents, see the “Real estate agents” section.

Employees with unconventional work schedules (also known as layoff days): Some employers agree with their employees on work schedules that provide for alternating work and vacation periods. Some employees, such as firefighters, health care workers and factory workers, sometimes have unconventional work schedules. When these types of employees do not work for seven or more consecutive days, there is no interruption of earnings.

If the employee has been dismissed and is entitled to leave under an employment agreement entered into to compensate for the overtime (time) worked during an established work schedule, indicate in box 18 of the ROE the period of leave during which the employee has rights as well as their work regime.

Examples

A firefighter works for 4 consecutive days, 24 hours a day (which corresponds to 96 insurable hours), then he is on leave for 10 consecutive days. In this case, even if the firefighter does not work for more than 7 consecutive days, he is still considered to be employed during the 10-day leave period. As a result, there is no interruption of earnings.

A minor works for 14 consecutive days, 12 hours a day (which corresponds to 168 insurable hours), then he is on leave for 7 consecutive days. In this case, even if the minor does not work for 7 consecutive days, he is still considered to be employed during the seven-day leave period. As a result, there is no interruption of earnings.

Commission sellers: For sellers mainly paid on commission, there is an interruption of earnings only when the employment contract ends, unless the seller stops working because he is sick, injured, quarantined, offers caring for or supporting a child or a seriously ill family member, caring for a newborn baby, adopted child or, if it is a seller, because she is pregnant or has given birth to a child. In other words, if the seller stops working for any other reason, for example because he is on authorized leave or on vacation, there is no interruption of earnings as long as the contract is valid. For more information on how to complete the ROE for commission sellers, see the “Commission Sellers” section.

When should I file a record of employment?

Whether or not the employee intends to apply for EI benefits, you must file an ROE when any of the following situations arise:

each time an employee in insurable employment experiences an interruption of earnings; or

when requested by Service Canada.

Notes You must file an ROE only in the circumstances provided by Service Canada.

only in circumstances provided by Service Canada. When an employer has to lay off a large number of employees, in the case of a plant closure, for example, he can call on Service Canada to advise on the production of ROEs. For more information, call the Employer Service Center at 1-800-367-5693 (TTY: 1-855-881-9874)

Special situations justifying the production of a record of employment

When Service Canada requests it: Most often, we ask you to file an ROE when the employee occupies two jobs and he / she experiences a stop in earnings related to one or the other of these jobs. In this case, if the employee applies for EI benefits, we need an ROE from the other employer, even if the employee is still working for him. We use the information from the two ROEs to calculate the amount of EI benefits for this employee and the number of weeks he could receive them.

When the type of pay period changes: When your business or organization changes the type of pay period, you must file an ROE for all employees, even if they do not suffer any interruption of earnings. For more information, see the note in the “Box 6 – Type of pay period” section.

When an employee, without changing employer, is transferred to another Canada Revenue Agency payroll account number: When an employer has more than one payroll account number (for more details, see box 5 – CRA business number) and that the employee’s payroll file is transferred to another payroll account number within the organization, he does not have to file an ROE if the following conditions are met:

there was no actual interruption in the payment of the employee’s remuneration during the transition period; and

the employer agrees to file a single ROE covering the two periods of employment, if applicable.

Note If the change in payroll account number implies a change in the type of pay period, you must file an ROE for the employee.

When a business changes ownership: When a business changes ownership, the former employer generally has to file an ROE for all employees. However, if the following two conditions apply, you do not have to file an ROE:

there was no actual interruption in the payment of the employee’s remuneration during the transition period; and

had an actual interruption in the payment of the employee’s remuneration during the transition period; the new employer keeps the payroll records of the old employer and agrees to file a single ROE for the two periods of employment, if applicable.

Note If the change in ownership requires a change in the type of pay period, you must file an ROE for all employees.

When an employer declares bankruptcy: If an employer declares bankruptcy and a trustee takes over the management of the business, the employer must generally produce an ROE for all employees. However, if the following two conditions apply, you do not have to file an ROE:

there was no actual interruption in the payment of the employee’s remuneration during the transition period; and

actual interruption in the payment of the employee’s remuneration during the transition period; the trustee keeps the employer’s pay files and agrees to file a single ROE for the two periods of employment, if applicable.

Note If the employee continues to work during the post-bankruptcy period, his earnings will be stopped only when he stops working, even if he has received no remuneration.

For a part-time, on-call or casual employee: You do not have to file ROEs each time a part-time, on-call or casual employee experiences a seven-day pay interruption or more. However, you must file an ROE in the following cases:

the employee requests an ROE and there has been an interruption of earnings;

and there was an interruption of earnings; the employee no longer works for you;

Service Canada requests an ROE; or

; the employee did no work for thirty days and received no insurable earnings for this period.

When the employee receives benefits under a salary insurance plan: When you offer your employees a salary insurance plan, you must produce an ROE:

if the indemnities are not insurable, as soon as there is an interruption of earnings; or

, as soon as there is interruption of earnings; if the benefits are insurable, as soon as your earnings stop, but you must file a second ROE thereafter, when the benefit payments end, for the period covered by the salary insurance plan.

During a period of self-funded leave: In certain workplaces, the employee may conclude a self-funded leave agreement with his employer. Under an agreement of this type, the employee spreads out part of his salary in order to finance a later period of leave. For example, the employee can work for four years, and defer 20% of the salary received during these four years to finance the leave he will take in the fifth year. During the period of self-funded leave, there is no interruption of earnings; therefore, you do not need to file an ROE, unless one of the parties terminates the agreement; in this case, you must produce one. You must file an ROE if either party terminates the agreement during the period of self-funded leave and the employee is not scheduled to return to work. You must then indicate in box 11, the date of the last day worked by the employee before the start of the self-funded leave.

Note Contact the Canada Revenue Agency for information on how to deduct EI premiums from earnings paid during the averaging period and self-funded leave.

Note If you use a pay service provider (FSP): you do not have to issue ROEs if you change your FSP. That said, if you wish to do so and your new FSP is unable to issue ROEs for the period of employment covered by your previous FSP, the latter can issue them until the new FSP takes relay.

How long do I have to file a record of employment?

Paper employment record

If you file a paper ROE, you must file it within five calendar days:

following the first day of interruption of earnings; or

following the day the employer is informed of the interruption of earnings.

Note If you file a paper ROE, you must give copy 1 (the original) to your employee. Also inform the employee that he must return it to Service Canada if he applies for employment insurance benefits. Your employee can send the originals by mail or drop them off at a Service Canada Center. Your employee will find the address to post them on the “Confirmation and Information” page after submitting their application for Employment Insurance benefits online.

Electronic record of employment

If you file an electronic ROE and your pay period is “weekly”, “fortnight” (every two weeks) or “biweekly” (twice a month, usually the fifteenth day and the last day of the month), you have up to five calendar days after the end of the pay period when the employee’s earnings were stopped to produce it.

If your pay period is of the type “monthly” or “13 pay periods per year” (every four weeks), you must file the electronic ROE before the earlier of the following two dates:

five calendar days after the end of the pay period during which the employee’s earnings were stopped; or

during which the employee’s earnings were stopped; fifteen calendar days after the first day of interruption of earnings.

Note If you file an electronic ROE, you do not have to give your employee a hard copy. For more information, see the section “Do I still need to give the employee a copy of the electronic record of employment?” ”

The deadline for filing an electronic ROE depends on the type of pay period and the day the interruption of earnings occurs.

Examples of deadlines for filing an electronic ROE

Type of pay period Example Weekly If your pay period is of the “weekly” type, you have five calendar days after the end of the pay period during which there was interruption of earnings to send the electronic ROE to Service Canada . Martin stops working on March 1, 2010, which is the first day of the interruption of earnings. Your “weekly” pay period extends from February 27, 2010 to March 5, 2010. Since the pay period during which there is interruption of earnings ends on March 5, 2010, you have up to ” to March 10, 2010 to produce Martin’s ROE. Fortnight If your pay period is of the “fortnight” type, you have five calendar days after the end of the pay period during which there was interruption of earnings to send the electronic ROE to Service Canada. Ginette stops working on March 1, 2010, which is the first day of the interruption of earnings. Your pay period, which is of “fortnight” type, extends from February 27, 2010 to March 12, 2010. Since the pay period during which there is interruption of earnings ends on March 12, 2010, you have up to ” on March 17, 2010 to produce Ginette’s RE. Biweekly If your pay period is “biweekly”, you have five calendar days after the end of the pay period during which there was interruption of earnings to send the electronic ROE to Service Canada. Safina stops working on March 1, 2010, which is the first day of the interruption of earnings. Your pay period, which is “biweekly”, extends from March 1, 2010 to March 15, 2010. Since the pay period during which there is interruption of earnings ends on March 15, 2010, you have up to ” to March 20, 2010 to produce the Safina ROE. Monthly If your pay period is of the “monthly” type, you must send the electronic ROE to Service Canada before the earlier of the following two dates: five calendar days after the end of the pay period during which the pay stoppage occurred employee compensation; or

fifteen calendar days after the first day of interruption of earnings. Example 1 Peter stops working on March 1, 2010, which is the first day of the interruption of earnings. Your pay period, which is of the “monthly” type, extends from March 1, 2010 to March 31, 2010. You must file the ROE before the earlier of the following two dates: five calendar days after the end of the pay period during which his earnings were stopped (April 5, 2010); or

fifteen calendar days after the first day of interruption of earnings (March 16, 2010). In this case, you have until March 16, 2010 to file Peter’s ROE, because it is the closer of the two dates. Example 2 Martha stops working on March 30, 2010, which is the first day of the interruption of earnings. Your pay period, which is of the “monthly” type, extends from March 1, 2010 to March 31, 2010. You must file the ROE before the earlier of the following two dates: five calendar days after the end of the pay period during which his earnings were stopped (April 5, 2010); or

fifteen calendar days after the first day of interruption of earnings (April 14, 2010). In this case, you have until April 5, 2010 to file Martha’s ROE, because it is the closer of the two dates. Thirteen pay periods per year (every four weeks) If your pay period is like “13 pay periods per year” (that is, you pay your employees every four weeks), you must file the electronic ROE before the earlier of the following two dates: five calendar days after the end of the pay period during which the employee’s earnings were stopped; or

fifteen calendar days after the first day of interruption of earnings. Example 1 Roberto stops working on March 1, 2010, which is the first day of interruption of earnings. Your pay period, which is like “13 pay periods a year”, ends on the fourth Sunday. The pay period during which there was interruption of earnings extends from March 1, 2010 to March 28, 2010. You must file the ROE before the earlier of the following two dates: five calendar days after the end of the period pay during which his earnings were stopped (April 2, 2010); or

fifteen calendar days after the first day of interruption of earnings (March 16, 2010). In this case, you have until March 16, 2010 to file Roberto’s ROE, because it is the closer of the two dates. Example 2 Juliette stops working on March 23, 2010, which is the first day of interruption of earnings. Your pay period extends from March 1, 2010 to March 28, 2010. You must file the ROE before the earlier of the following two dates: five calendar days after the end of the pay period during which the employee stopped working compensation (April 2, 2010); or

fifteen calendar days after the first day of interruption of earnings (April 7, 2010). In this case, you have until April 2, 2010 to file Juliette’s ROE, because it is the closer of the two dates.

Do I still need to give the employee a copy of the electronic ROE?

No. If you are sending your employee’s ROE electronically, you do not need to print a hard copy. When you send the ROE electronically, the data is sent directly to Service Canada systems. We then use this data to process claims for EI benefits.

Notes Make sure that the employee knows that you are going to send his ROE to Service Canada electronically, and that in this case, he must not send a copy to Service Canada.

to Service Canada electronically, and in this case, send a copy to Service Canada. If the employee is registered with the My Service Canada Account online tool, he can use it to view and print copies of his electronic record of employment. To learn more about this tool, he should consult My Service Canada Account.

Even if you are no longer required to print a paper copy of the ROE when you send it electronically, you should, as a courtesy, provide a copy to your employee if they request it. However, you must remind him that he should not send this copy to Service Canada.

when you send it electronically, you should, as a courtesy, provide a copy to your employee if they request it. However, you must remind him that he must send this copy to Service Canada. If your employee wants to apply for employment insurance benefits, remind him that he must submit his claim as soon as possible after the interruption of earnings, even if ” he did not receive all of his ROEs (more specifically, those produced on paper).

For more information on how to send ROEs electronically, see The ROE on the Web, or call the Employer Service Center at 1-800-367-5693 (TTY: 1-855-881- 9874).

How long do I have to keep payroll records related to ROEs?

Whether you file paper or electronic ROEs, you must keep all related payroll records for six years after the year to which the data relate, either on paper or in electronic format.

Do I have to keep paper copies of the record of employment?

If you file a paper ROE, you must keep copy 3 for six years after the year to which the data relate. Make sure to keep it in a safe place. Once you have completed an ROE, the information it contains is considered confidential.

Si vous produisez un RE électronique, vous n’avez pas à conserver de copie papier, mais vous devez garder les données pendant les six années suivant l’année à laquelle elles se rapportent.

Où dois-je envoyer la copie 2 du relevé d’emploi papier?

Vous devez envoyer la copie 2 (bleue) du RE papier dûment rempli au centre des RE de Service Canada à Bathurst (Nouveau-Brunswick), à l’adresse suivante :

Service Canada

C.P. 9000

Bathurst (Nouveau-Brunswick) E2A 4T3

Le centre des RE de Bathurst ne s’occupe d’aucune autre tâche liée au RE ou à l’assurance-emploi. Vous devez donc envoyer uniquement la copie 2 du RE à l’adresse indiquée ci-dessus. Toute la correspondance et tous les autres documents liés au RE doivent être acheminés au Centre Service Canada de votre localité.

Remarque Si vous produisez un RE électronique, n’envoyez pas de copie papier à Service Canada.

Où dois-je envoyer la correspondance et tous les autres documents liés au relevé d’emploi?

Vous devez acheminer la correspondance et tous les autres documents liés au RE au Centre Service Canada de votre localité. La copie 2 (bleue) du RE est le seul document que vous devez envoyer au centre des RE de Bathurst (Nouveau-Brunswick).

Est-ce que je peux apporter des changements à un relevé d’emploi papier après l’avoir rempli?

Oui, mais seulement si vous avez encore en votre possession les trois copies. Dans ce cas, vous pourrez le corriger en procédant comme suit :

barrez d’abord l’information incorrecte d’un trait;

inscrivez ensuite les bons renseignements; et

apposez vos initiales à côté de chaque changement.

Remarque N’utilisez jamais de liquide ou de ruban correcteur.

Si vous avez déjà distribué des copies du RE papier, vous ne pourrez pas le modifier. Dans ce cas, vous devrez produire un RE modifié. Voir « Dans quelles circonstances dois-je modifier un relevé d’emploi? » pour savoir comment procéder.

Est-ce que je peux annuler un relevé d’emploi?

Non. Vous ne pouvez pas annuler un RE que vous avez déjà produit. Si vous avez produit un RE par erreur, vous devez produire un RE modifié. Consultez la section suivante pour savoir comment procéder.

Dans quelles circonstances dois-je modifier un relevé d’emploi?

Vous devez modifier un RE dans les circonstances suivantes :

Vous devez corriger, mettre à jour ou modifier l’information que vous avez déjà inscrite sur un RE . Exemple

Après que vous avez produit le RE initial, le départ de votre employé passe de provisoire à définitif et cet employé n’a pas travaillé depuis que vous avez produit le RE initial. Parce que le départ de l’employé est maintenant définitif, vous devez lui verser une autre somme lors de sa cessation d’emploi, soit une paie de vacances. Dans ce cas-ci, vous devez produire un RE modifié qui inclura cette information. Par contre, si vous n’avez aucun nouveau renseignement à fournir, vous n’avez pas besoin de produire de RE modifié. Remarque Si un de vos employés en congé a reçu un RE et qu’il vous avise qu’il ne reviendra pas au travail, vous n’êtes pas tenu de produire un RE modifié, puisqu’il s’agit d’une séparation permanente. Cela dit, si vous versez des prestations supplémentaires à l’employé, dans ce cas, vous devez produire un RE modifié.

. Vous avez transmis un RE à Service Canada par erreur. Lorsque vous remplissez le RE modifié, indiquez « Le précédent RE a été produit par erreur » à la case 18, Observations.

à Service Canada par erreur. Lorsque vous remplissez le modifié, indiquez « Le précédent a été produit par erreur » à la case 18, Observations. Service Canada vous demande de le faire.

Remarque Lorsque vous produisez un RE modifié, vous devez remplir toutes les cases du RE, et non pas seulement celles où les renseignements diffèrent de ceux du RE initial.

Que dois-je faire pour modifier un relevé d’emploi électronique?

Pour plus de renseignements sur la façon de produire un relevé d’emploi électronique :

Si vous utilisez RE Web, consultez les instructions d’aide de RE Web, ou appelez le Centre de services aux employeurs au 1-800-367-5693 ( ATS : 1-855-881-9874).

Web, consultez les instructions d’aide de Web, ou appelez le Centre de services aux employeurs au ( : 1-855-881-9874). Si vous utilisez RE TAP, communiquez avec votre fournisseur de services de paie.

Remarque Si vous modifiez un RE papier par voie électronique, inscrivez « Modification d’un RE papier » à la case 18, Observations. Inscrivez aussi le numéro de série du RE papier initial.

Que dois-je faire pour modifier un relevé d’emploi papier?

Pour modifier un RE papier :

utilisez un RE vierge;

vierge; à la case 2, inscrivez le numéro de série du RE initial que vous modifiez;

initial que vous modifiez; assurez-vous de remplir toutes les cases, même lorsque l’information est la même que celle que vous avez inscrite sur le RE initial;

initial; corrigez toute information qui était erronée sur le RE initial.

Remarque Lorsque vous produisez un RE papier modifié, il n’est pas nécessaire d’ajouter d’observations à la case 18 pour indiquer qu’il s’agit d’un RE modifié.

Que dois-je faire des relevés d’emploi papier annulés ou excédentaires?

Si vous avez des RE papier annulés (par exemple des RE qui contenaient des erreurs), vous pouvez les détruire. Avant de les détruire, assurez-vous de prendre en note leurs numéros de série et conservez-les avec vos dossiers de paie.

Si vous avez des RE excédentaires, communiquez avec le Centre de services aux employeurs, au 1-800-367-5693 ( ATS : 1-855-881-9874). Les agents vous donneront des directives sur la façon de les retourner.

Comment puis-je commander des relevés d’emploi papier?

Pour commander des RE papier, communiquez avec le Centre de services aux employeurs au 1-800-367-5693 ( ATS : 1-855-881-9874). Lorsque vous passerez votre commande, ayez en main votre numéro de compte de retenues sur la paie de l’Agence du revenu du Canada aux fins d’identification.

À qui dois-je m’adresser si j’ai besoin de plus d’information?